Thursday, 11 February 2010

Lights-off! at Billboards and Advertising signs

On Wednesday, the Venezuelan government banned the use of electricity on billboards and advertisements as part of a contingency plan. The resolution also prohibits the lighting of the ads and billboards located in public roads, with the exception of pharmacies, health centres and secure facilities if they use energy saving bulbs.

The government said the new prohibitions will remain in place "until it exceeds the emergency". The breach of the regulation will be punished with the suspension of electric service for 24 hours and that if they do it again, it will be for 48 hours or cessation of the service indefinitely.

President Hugo Chávez earlier this week declared a state of emergency power due to a drought crisis generated by the Guri, which is the largest generator of electricity in the country.

Victor Maldonado, executive director of the leading business chamber of the capital, considered as "cosmetic'' the government's decision and said the measure will generate harm to advertisers. He added that the measure will not have a major impact on energy savings.

More news here and here.

Resolution No 008, Official Gazette here.

2 comments:

Anonymous said...

This blog continues to be a news update on Latin America more than IP news blog.

Jeremy said...

With respect, dear Anonymous, IP does not exist in a vacuum; it is closely integrated into the fabric of business and commerce throughout Latin America.

The unspoken premise in this item is that the use of billboards and other electronic advertising media is the principal manner in which many branded products are brought to the attention of the consumer, the way in which goodwill is cultivated and the vehicle for enabling products and services to be distinguished from one another.

The Chavez declaration sends out a message to the brand-based business community that the cultivation of the consumer interest by the private sector is not a key priority.